Articles


Natural Anti-Cancer Protocol (for dogs and other animals)

Excellent article, a must read

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Neutering Dogs: Effects on Joint Disorders and Cancers and More

Neutering Dogs: Effects on Joint Disorders, Cancers and More

Excellent article with important things to consider when making the decision to neuter your dog.

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Pet Wellness Update article

http://www.pet-wellness-update.com/

Welcome to Pet Wellness Update, a website dedicated to reform rabies laws nationwide to exempt sick and senior dogs and cats from mandatory rabies booster shots when they are in the care of a licensed veterinarian.

Aimee's Story

In 2005, I took a healthy 12 year old calico house cat for a rabies booster shot.

Within six months, she began to show signs of ill health - dramatic weight loss, great thirst, poor coat, bad breath, eye discharge, ear mites, frequent urination and frequent vomiting. A year later, after a roller coaster of treatment, progress and regression, in the midst of an ice storm unprecedented in Texas history, Aimee was in kidney failure and dying.

I wanted her passing to be painless and peaceful.

Only one local vet was available in that moment; all the others in our area were ice-bound. She didn't know us and because my cat's ''shots were not current,'' i.e., within the last year - and she could not risk a bite by an ''unvaccinated animal'' - she would gas down my cat. I could not be present.

My animal was in pain. She had no hope to live. I would not prolong her suffering. So I gave my sweet, warm kitty to the veterinarian who disappeared. When she returned, she handed Aimee to me as a corpse.

While kidney failure was the cause of her demise, it was almost certainly triggered by the rabies shot she received - but did not need - in 2005.

It rocked my world to be prevented from holding Aimee for the euthanasia because her rabies shot “was not current.” I do not want to repeat this scene or see any other pet owner have to go through it.

Sadly, they do.

In a new report published in The Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, despite the extreme under-reporting of vaccinal adverse reactions, between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2007, the Center for Veterinary Biologics stated that, ''nearly 10,000 adverse event reports (all animal species) were received by manufacturers of rabies vaccines...Approximately 65% of the manufacturer's reports involved dogs.'' ''Postmarketing Surveillance of Rabies Vaccines for Dogs to Evaluate Safety and Efficacy''JAVMA April 1, 2008 issue, Vol. 232, No. 7

Read hundreds of personal accounts on our petition to exempt sick and senior pets from rabies vaccine. These are a fraction of the tens of thousands of dog and cat lovers who have experienced the negative effects of rabies control and prevention laws bas... Read More

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Saluki Articles by Gail Goodman

Saluki Articles by Gail Goodman

Beautifully written and historically rich articles about the history of the Saluki in its native lands. Please explore the link below to begin a wonderful and unforgettable journey... one lived and documented by Gail Goodman, one of the breed's premier historians. For those of you who enjoy these articles you may also wish to acquire a copy of Saluqi: Coursing Hound of the East. This unique and unforgettable volume is available in a very limited quantity, directly from the publisher.

Midabar Salukis: Articles

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Spay, Neuter and Cancer: Revisiting the Old Trinity

...original article can be viewed at the link below...

http://mmilani.com/commentary-200509.html

Spay, Neuter, and Cancer: Revisiting and Old Trinity

Perhaps no aspect of pet ownership in the U.S. elicits as passionately supportive emotions as the subject of spay and neuter.
In fact, this orientation is so well established that saying anything that questions the procedure is akin to blasphemy. However, just as women were routinely relieved of their reproductive organs with a ''La de da, you'll never miss 'em'' attitude until studies exploring the nonreproductive effects of reproductive hormones made human physicians rethink this position, so veterinarians and other animal-
care professionals are making tentative moves to rethink wholesale sterilization of companion animals, too.

To understand what difference this may make in our attitudes about the procedure, let's consider the subject of cancer. Most dog owners have heard that spay and neuter prevent testicular and mammary (breast) cancer: however is that the whole story relative to cancer or is there more to it?
Obviously, if we remove a dog's testicles, there's no way he'll develop testicular cancer. On the other hand, most dogs who develop testicular cancer respond well to castration, so the advantages of
preventive surgery are perhaps not as great as one might expect.

Although intact (unsterilized) females have a higher incidence of mammary cancer, the dog's weight plays an important role in the
process: intact females who are lean at one year of age have a lower incidence of the disease compared to their chunky cohorts.
In an interesting article in the August Veterinary Practice News entitled ''Can we neuter cancer in dogs?'' veterinary oncologist Kevin Hahn opens by saying that, after reviewing studies reported over the
last 30 years, he's not sure what to recommend to his clients. Like most veterinarians, Dr Hahn mentions the higher incidence of testicular and mammary cancer in intact animals, but also notes that
spayed females have a 4 times greater risk of cardiac hemangiosarcomas, and neutered males also show a significant increased risk for this cancer compared to intact ones.

Another cancer Dr Hahn discusses that deserves mention is prostate cancer because a lot of people erroneously believe that castration prevents this. In reality, it does not. In fact, castrated dogs have
up to a 4 times greater risk of developing prostate cancer than intact animals. At t... Read More

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Spay/Neuter Health Effects

Long Term Health Effects of Spay and Neuter in Dogs

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